Mexican Pride - Chiles Enogados

Mexican Pride - Chiles Enogados

Every time I talk to people in the US, I am shocked to hear how horrible it seems the economic situation is there. I get the feeling the US is falling apart, with everyone losing their jobs, people afraid to make any big purchases or changes, and a government debt climbing higher than the human brain can even comprehend. It sounds like doomsday. But the ironic thing is, when I talk to people South of the border, they all seem incredibly worried about me, being in Mexico! In this great article by Enrique Krauze in the New York Times, the author shares my sentiment:

The opinion that Mexico is breaking down seems to be shared by much of the American news media, not to mention the Americans I meet by chance and who, at the first opportunity, ask me whether Mexico will “fall apart.”

Flash to Mexico. While the news shows stories of narcotraficantes killing each other, the peso has devalued nearly 50% compared to the Dollar, and the US is sending notices that Mexico is now too dangerous for travel, life on the ground in Mexico City is fabulous. (Expats agree … frustrating at times, but certainly safe.) I can honestly say, I have noticed no changes in everyday life in Mexico City due to the recession.  And it is not just me, I have talked to many people – Mexicans and foreigners, from the upper and lower-classes, who agree. Sure, international businesses are troubled, but on the street it is a different story. Why? In spite of all the dangers, negative press, and the reality of the 50% devaluation of the Peso, “this is nothing compared to the crises of ___(insert year here)___.”  You see, Mexicans have lived through a lot of shit. And they have survived. So this crises, this is an American Crisis. But this is not a Mexican crises.

Mexican Tradition - hanging by the bootstraps

Mexican Tradition - hanging by the bootstraps

 

Again, quoting from Enrique Krauze, NY Times, “Thanks to all this, Mexico has demonstrated an impressive capacity to overcome crises, of which we’ve had our fair share. They include the government’s repression of the student movement of 1968; a currency devaluation in 1976; an economic crisis in 1982; the threefold disaster of 1994 with the Zapatista rebel uprising, the murder of the P.R.I. candidate for president and a devastating collapse of the peso; and the serious post-election conflicts of 2006.

Life in Mexico may not be what it is in the US. Nor has it ever been. But people here live in the reality that it is better than it could be, which gives them a positive outlook strong enough to overcome many crises, no matter how grande. Perhaps the Americans North of the border should take an example from the Mexicans for once … Tranquilo! No te preocupes, todo está bien! … Relax! Don’t worry, it’s all good! 
Try to be grateful for all that you have, and stop spending what you dont have!

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